Record Missouri flooding was manmade calamity, not climate change, scientist says

Watts Up With That?

Remember when some low caliber science pundits immediately jumper on the “climate change” bandwagon of blame? It turns out that as usual, they were wrong. This new study shows extreme flooding on Meramec and Mississippi rivers in late December cannot be blamed solely on 3-day rain, “channelization” of river was a major factor, according to the study

From WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY IN ST. LOUIS

Intersection of Interstate 44 and Route 141 in St. Louis County, Mo., on Dec. 30, 2015. Water levels more than 4 feet higher than previous record floods closed a 20-mile stretch of the highway. CREDIT Copyright Sid Hastings. Intersection of Interstate 44 and Route 141 in St. Louis County, Mo., on Dec. 30, 2015. Water levels more than 4 feet higher than previous record floods closed a 20-mile stretch of the highway. CREDIT Copyright Sid Hastings.

At the end of December 2015, a huge storm named “Goliath” dumped 9-10 inches of rain in a belt across the central United States, centered just southwest of St. Louis, most of it in a three-day downpour.

The rain blanketed the Meramec Basin, an area of 4,000 square…

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Brutal Freeze kills 85+ people in Tropical Taiwan

Watts Up With That?

Tengwang Pavilion, 2008, public domain image source Wikimedia. Tengwang Pavilion, 2008, public domain image source Wikimedia.

Guest essay by Eric Worrall

The global warming which recently hit the USA, has spread to a large area of East Asia, with reports of a brutal cold snap which has killed at least 85 people in Taiwan, and confirmed snowfall as far south as the Japanese island Okinawa, on the Northern edge of the Tropics.

Record low temperatures have wreaked havoc in several Asia countries, with 85 people reported dead in Taiwan and tens of thousands stranded at airports because of the unprecedented cold snap.

In South Korea, at least 90,300 saw their flights canceled over the weekend due to bad weather and more than 10,000 travelers faced severe delays at Kunming airport in southwestern China.

Taiwan authorities advised people to stay indoors after the deaths, while in Hong Kong, teeth-chattering temperatures forced kindergartens and primary schools to…

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