NASA takes AIM on noctilucent clouds

Watts Up With That?

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From AIM. High up in the sky near the poles some 50 miles above the ground, silvery blue clouds sometimes appear, shining brightly in the night. First noticed in 1885, these clouds are known as noctilucent, or “night shining,” clouds. Their discovery spawned over a century of research into what conditions causes them to form and vary – questions that still tantalize scientists to this day. Since 2007, a NASA mission called Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) has shown that the cloud formation is changing year to year, a process they believe is intimately tied to the weather and climate of the whole globe.

“The formation of the clouds requires both water and incredibly low temperatures,” says Charles Jackman, an atmospheric scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., who is NASA’s project scientist for AIM. “The temperatures turn out to be one of the…

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